I guess it’s the nature of Tumblr, but it would have been nice to have a "From Fatadelic" credit attached to this, seeing as it was extracted from one of my blog posts. http://fatadelic.wordpress.com/2008/05/11/diet-talk-and-fat-acceptance
Cheers.
nynakin:

1. Self Acceptance ≠ Body Acceptance
Self Acceptance relates to the inner whereas Body Acceptance relates to the outer… [read more]
2. Fat Acceptance vs Size Acceptance – Allies with a difference
Philosophically, Size Acceptance and Fat Acceptance are very similar.   SA and FA both advocate an end to size & weight related  discrimination. The point of difference to my mind is that Fat Acceptance explicitly  states that FAT is – and must be – part of that discussion; there can be  no upper weight or size limit to our quest for rights and acceptance… [read more]
3. Dieting and Body Acceptance are mutually exclusive If you are dieting, then you believe your body as it currently stands is  unacceptable. It really doesn’t  matter whether you are trying to lose weight for cosmetic or ‘health  reasons’… [read more]
4.  Therefore Fat Acceptance and Dieting are mutually exclusive If you believe your own body is so unacceptable that you must starve and  shrink it, then by extension, you also must believe that bodies of  people who are as large or larger than you are unacceptable…   [read more]
5. Diet all you like, just don’t talk about it in Fat Acceptance spacesI really don’t care if you diet. But Fat Acceptance  spaces are one place where that cultural pressure is eased (not removed,  eased) for a while.  I do not require your validation for my choice,  nor do I require you to stop dieting…  [read more]

I guess it’s the nature of Tumblr, but it would have been nice to have a "From Fatadelic" credit attached to this, seeing as it was extracted from one of my blog posts. http://fatadelic.wordpress.com/2008/05/11/diet-talk-and-fat-acceptance

Cheers.

nynakin:

1. Self Acceptance ≠ Body Acceptance

Self Acceptance relates to the inner whereas Body Acceptance relates to the outer… [read more]

2. Fat Acceptance vs Size Acceptance – Allies with a difference

Philosophically, Size Acceptance and Fat Acceptance are very similar. SA and FA both advocate an end to size & weight related discrimination. The point of difference to my mind is that Fat Acceptance explicitly states that FAT is – and must be – part of that discussion; there can be no upper weight or size limit to our quest for rights and acceptance… [read more]

3. Dieting and Body Acceptance are mutually exclusive
If you are dieting, then you believe your body as it currently stands is unacceptable. It really doesn’t matter whether you are trying to lose weight for cosmetic or ‘health reasons’… [read more]

4. Therefore Fat Acceptance and Dieting are mutually exclusive
If you believe your own body is so unacceptable that you must starve and shrink it, then by extension, you also must believe that bodies of people who are as large or larger than you are unacceptable… [read more]

5. Diet all you like, just don’t talk about it in Fat Acceptance spaces
I really don’t care if you diet. But Fat Acceptance spaces are one place where that cultural pressure is eased (not removed, eased) for a while. I do not require your validation for my choice, nor do I require you to stop dieting…  [read more]

(via nynakin-deactivated20120301)

“Fat and Fatter” Grrr!

Normally wouldn’t post this in two places - but I’ve just posted this to my main blog in response to Australia’s ABC screening a program called “Fat and Fatter” which is extemely fat hating, exploitative and offensive.

“Fat and Fatter” is the most offensively fat-hating program I have ever seen – and worse, it masqueraded as ‘helping’ two young girls, when in reality it was just a freak show with scare tactics thrown in. No doubt this was someone’s misguided attempt at a ‘public health notice’, but that’s not an excuse. Fat nd Fatter is just not up to ABC’s normally high broadcast standards, and I am appalled that the ABC even considered obtaining screening rights to this exploitative tabloid show, let alone actually going so far as to screen it.

The full post is on my main blog.

It occurred to me the other day that fat – considered, in excess, a prima facie pathogen – has come to occupy the place of the medieval humours, and diet and exercise regimens, to make no mention of actual invasive surgery, are absolutely modern bloodletting. The parallels are actually kind of spooky: near-universal support from the medical establishment, temporary and perceptual gains in health, and, on the unlikely realization of its stated goal, mortality.


Physician, heal thyself.

— From ‘Medieval' by Defective Thin Person.

Go read this in full now. Seriously. Now.

Fatshionista on being a fat kid and ‘childhood obesity’:

Nothing that happened to me as a kid, none of the changes I went through, none of the self-loathing I absorbed, none of the teasing I tolerated, none of it would have taken place if I were fat in a vacuum. None of it happened exclusively as a result of my fatness. It happened because of the culture in which I was living, a culture we all share to one degree or another. It happened because I received, processed, assimilated and internalized the negative messages about what fat people can and cannot do, and what fat people are and cannot be. It happened because my peers did the same and acted out those cultural expectations upon me; because my pediatrician believed that putting a nine-year-old child only slightly bigger than average on a diet was a smart and responsible choice; because my parents, trying only to raise me as a happy and healthy kid, thought that I needed help in order to be normal. My fat was never the problem; the problem was living in a world that targeted fat people as defective, unintelligent, ill, repulsive. [My emphasis]  If I hadn’t felt singled out, if I hadn’t been utterly convinced that no one in the world aside from my parents would like me, let alone love me, until I stopped being fat… my childhood and teenage years probably would have been very different. Indeed, if I hadn’t beaten my metabolism to a pulp through compulsive dieting during my formative years, I may even not be as fat as I am today. I’ll never know.
This is why when I hear or see anything on the subject of Michelle Obama’s new campaign against “childhood obesity”, I feel a terrible knot in my stomach, because I know this sort of approach will always, inevitably, turn into a campaign against obese children. And fat kids have enough to worry about, frankly. They have to fight hard already to resist this culture that tells them their size will always hold them back; they do not need to be further singled out by a crusade mounted by this nation’s (in all other respects, rightfully so) beloved First Lady. I was damaged as a result of being a fat kid, certainly; however, what damaged me was not my fat, but the messages I received about fatness. I was damaged by both perceiving myself and being treated by others as inferior, an object, something in need of repair, and not a person worthy of basic respect. I was seriously damaged by the endless dieting, such that I grew into adulthood with absolutely no idea of how to eat in a healthful and self-aware way. I was damaged by the idea that so long as I was fat, my life would be forever on hold, as only thin people get to be smart or successful in life.
Call it a campaign against childhood couch-sitting. Call it a drive to get kids to go outside and play, in the grand tradition of the many hours I spent doing the same as a (fat) kid. Call it a movement to educate children on basic nutrition and how their amazing growing bodies work for them. But don’t single out the fat kids. Their burden is already heavy enough. And if I am any indication, doing this will only ensure that this generation will be fatter than ever, dragging behind them huge heaps of food issues and low self-esteem as a bonus. Not all of them will be as strong-willed, independently-thinking, and plain old determined as I have been, and as many of you have been, who were able to shed the fat-based self-loathing and begin that crazy adventure towards self-acceptance. Many of them will struggle with body hatred for the rest of their lives.